mymindisanisland:

knocking on my door

2014 ||| flickr ||| etsy ||| fb ||| behance |||

littlelimpstiff14u2:

Daria Hlazatova

I’m Daria Hlazatova. I live in Ukraine and have a particular passion for drawing and making handmade collages. I live in a hilly city near Carpathian mountains, but the view from my window is rather dull.
As a child I dreamt to become an oceanologist, but I have only one marine diver and a dozen of artists in my family so my art genes won over.
I find inspiration in travelling, music, fairy-tales, theatre and animals. So my art is mostly about all these things put together with a wee bit of nonsense.
My drawings and collages have been a part of several exhibitions, art projects and magazines in the USA, the UK, Spain and Ukraine

Her work can be found on Society 6 and Prisma Collective

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ancientart:

A few examples of Roman glass at the MET.

The garland bowl shown in the first image is, in my opinion, one of the finest example of Roman glass preserved for us today. Dating to the reign of Augustus in the first century, it has by some miracle remained essentially intact, except for a small chip to the rim and some weathering on the exterior. It is made up of four separate slices of translucent glass: blue, yellow, purple, and colourless. As you can see, each segment was then decorated with a small strip of millefiori glass which depict a garland hanging from an opaque white cord. It is extremely rare indeed that large sections of glass from antiquity were made up of different coloured glass. As the MET notes: it is also the only example that combines the technique with millefiori decoration. As such it represents the peak of the glass worker’s skill at producing cast vessels.

The two-handled bottle second shown is early Imperial, dating to the 1st century AD. The jug in the shape of a bunch of grapes is late Imperial, dating to about the 3rd century AD.

Courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, via their online collections91.1.140217.194.157 & 17.194.253.

littlelimpstiff14u2:

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on September 9, 2014
A new evolution of his menagerie of mutants, Nicholas Di Genova’s solo show “Ultima” is currently on view at LE Gallery in Toronto through September 27. Since we featured the artist back in Hi-Fructose Vol. 10, he has developed a new series of drawings and sculptures that bring to life his vision of hybridized species. Naturalistic diagrams explain in logical steps the genealogy and behaviors of parrot-men and shark-birds. While his drawings are flat and sometimes cartoon-like, his equally whimsical sculptures add another dimension to his visual vocabulary. Take a look at some works from “Ultima”
architectureofdoom:

architizer:

Richard Sexton’s ravishing take on Latin Caribbean architecture.

Partially demolished building with Edifico FOSCA in the background, Vedado neighborhood, Havana, Cuba

architectureofdoom:

architizer:

Richard Sexton’s ravishing take on Latin Caribbean architecture.

Partially demolished building with Edifico FOSCA in the background, Vedado neighborhood, Havana, Cuba

(via jondek)

leslieseuffert:

Lizzie Buckmaster Dove (Australia) Year of Walking, 2014

hifructosemag:

Design collective Numen/For Use was incepted in 1998 as a way for its members — industrial designers Sven Jonke, Christoph Katzler and Nikola Radeljković — to push the boundaries of architecture, design and conceptual art. They’ve collaborated on everything from furniture design to elaborate installations that invite the viewers to break the norms of how they ordinarily interact with space. Rarely do we see adults take off their shoes to bounce and play, but Numen invites their audiences to do just that. Their latest piece,String in Vienna is an inflatable, bounce house-like structure with an elaborate grid of cords that allow viewers (more aptly, participants) to defy gravity. Their other recent works include a levitating cave made out of clear tape in Tokyo and another inflatable structure with hammock-like netting hung strategically for optimal bouncing in Yokohama, Japan.

See more on Hi-Fructose.

sidewaysburnouts:

A town in Central Russia has reemerged from the depths of a reservoir after severe water shortages caused water levelsto drop dramatically.

The town of Mologa in the Yaroslavl region has remained underwater since Stalinist times, but a recent drought and the ensuing drop in water levels has uncovered the town’s churches, houses and even a cemetery, the ITAR-Tass news agency reported.

 Mologa in central Russia was once a thriving place—before Joseph Stalin decided in 1935 to flood it and make way for a reservoir and hydroelectric power station. Some 130,000 people were forced from their homes and an estimated 300 who refused to leave were drowned, recounts the BBC.Flooded in the 1940s to create the Rybinsk Reservoir on the Volga River, parts of Mologa are uncovered every couple of years as water levels drop, prompting former residents to revisit the town’s landmarks and the graves of their relatives.

monument erected in November 2003 commemorates the several hundred Mologa residents who refused the authorities’ evacuation order and chose to go down with their houses rather than vacate their properties to make way for the hydroelectric power plant.

Though many former residents sail to the spot of what the news service calls the “Russian Atlantis” each year, one got more than he bargained for this summer: Thanks to a recent drought, Nikolai Novotelnov was able to “walk his native turf again.”

Foundations of buildings and the outline of streets are now exposed. “Here was the inn, over there was the Voikov school and the flour store,” Novotelnov, who was forced from the town at 17, told Russia’s TV Tsentr, per the BBC. “Communist Street ran that way, towards the district administration building, the chemists, and my house,” he added. While he left flowers at the foundation of the once-grand Cathedral of the Epiphany and packed up bricks to bring back to fellow Mologans, he isn’t likely to be the only one to returnRIA Novosti reports many former residents and their descendants now plan on making the journey back home.Interior Ministry officer report describes the horrible fate of the people who didn’t want to leave their homes when the Rybinsk Power Plant got under construction. When it was decided to build a huge water reservoir on the banks of River Volga and its confluents, 130 thousand people were moved to new lands and 4 600 kilometers of fertile land, 700 villages, 140 churches and monasteries, and an ancient Russian city Mologa submerged into the waters of the reservoir. 294 people enchained themselves and remained under water.

 

(via the1manpizzaparty)

artmastered:

John French Sloan, McSorley’s Bar, 1912, oil on canvas, 66 x 81.2 cm, Detroit Institute of Arts. Source

artmastered:

John French Sloan, McSorley’s Bar, 1912, oil on canvas, 66 x 81.2 cm, Detroit Institute of Arts. Source

architectureofdoom:

HAKA building, Rotterdam, H.F. Mertens/J. Koeman, 1931-32. View this on the map. Pictures by Jan Sluijter.

Driven by curiosity. Blog that represents my Dictionary of Art. Links: Website // My work on Tumblr // Instagram